Posts Tagged ‘Synonyms’

SSAT Synonyms: Don’t Let the Attractors Stump You!

SSAT Synonyms

SSAT instructor Terri of Prepped & Polished teaches you how to avoid getting stumped by the attractor answer choices on the SSAT Synonyms section.

4 SSAT Synonyms Tips:
1. Anticipate the answer
2. Part of speech will be consistent
3. Before being drawn to an attractor, think of context of word
4. Master vocabulary and acquaint yourself with word parts and word origins

Are you taking the SSAT Test? Any follow up qs for Terri?

Post your tips/comments below.

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November 16th, 2014
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Power Strategies to Master Synonyms for ISEE and SSAT

SSAT and ISEE Tutor Terri K. of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts teaches you five power strategies and one bonus tip for the SSAT and ISEE Synonym section.

1. When you know the stem word, cover the choices. Think of the word phrase or definition closest in meaning to the stem word. Then look for that word among the answer choices.
2. If you don’t know the stem word, put it in context.

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3. If the stem word is positive then the answer choice must be positive. If the stem word is negative then the answer choice must be negative.
4. Use prefixes and suffixes to provide clues to figure out the meaning of words.
5. Use all the power strategies to help you eliminate. Cross out answers that are farthest from the meaning of the stem word. On the ISEE always guess. On the SSAT guess after eliminating at least two answer choices.

BONUS TIP: The best way to excel on the SSAT and ISEE synonyms is to READ and look up unfamiliar words right away to increase vocabulary knowledge.

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi. I’m Terri, with Prepped & Polished in South Natick, Massachusetts.
Today, I’m going to share some power strategies with you to help you master
synonyms on the ISEE and the SSAT. Synonym questions make up 50% of the
verbal reasoning portion on both tests. It’s to your advantage to
assimilate these power strategies and make them work for you.Let’s talk a little bit about format. All synonym questions have a stem
word in capital letters, followed by 4 answer choices on the ISEE and 5
answer choices on the SSAT. Your task is to select the answer choice that
is closest in meaning to the stem word. Let’s try that out with Power
Strategy #1.When you know the stem word, cover the answer choices, and then think of a
word, phrase or definition closest in meaning to the stem word. Then look
for that word among the answer choices. For ‘bizarre’, you think to
yourself, “Strange is close in meaning,” then you’re going to uncover the
answer choices. ‘Only’ doesn’t work, ‘unable’, ‘found’. The closest in
meaning to ‘strange’ is ‘odd’; there’s your answer.Power Strategy #2: If you don’t know the stem word, try to think of a
context that you know. Have you heard the word before? Have you read the
word before? Let’s try two examples. ‘Abate’: Maybe you’ve heard a weather
person say, “The storm will abate by midnight,” and you took that to mean
‘reduce in intensity’ or ‘lessen’. Let’s see if any of the choices match
that. Not ‘pretend’, not ‘finalize’, not ‘endanger’, or ‘oppose’.
‘Decrease’ would be the right answer. How about ‘surrogate’? Perhaps you’ve
heard of a surrogate mother, a substitute mother, and we actually see that
word for Choice E. We know right away, right off the bat, that that’s the
correct answer. Done.Power Strategy #3: Positive/Negative. If a stem word is positive, then the
answer choice must be positive. If a stem word is negative, the answer
choice must be negative. Let’s look at an example: ‘Belligerent’, is a
negative word. I don’t know if you’re familiar with ‘bell-‘, a word part,
but that means war-like. Belligerent is a negative word. It helps if you
put + and – signs next to the words to see which are positive and negative.
We can get rid of A, C, and E right off the bat, and we’re less with
‘messy’ and ‘antagonistic’. Belligerent is closest in meaning to
antagonistic, so D is the correct answer.Power Strategy #4: Word Parts. Word parts can give you powerful clues to
figure out the meaning of words. Prefixes come at the beginning of words,
suffixes are at the end, and a root can be in any part of the word. Let’s
look at a few examples. Apathy: The prefix ‘A’ means without, ‘-pathy’
means feelings or emotions, so ‘without feelings or emotions’. Let’s look
at the choices: Sorrow, ability, sickness, inconvenience; indifference is
the closest in meaning to ‘without feelings’, so E would be the correct
answer.How about monotonous? ‘Mono’ means one and ‘tone’ has to do with sound. If
you heard one sound over and over, it would be annoying and it would also
be repetitious. We know that D, ‘repetitious’, would be the correct answer,
and that’s how word parts can help you.

Power Strategy #5: Eliminate. Use all of the power strategies to help you
eliminate. Cross out answers that are farthest from the meaning of the stem
word. This is a real timesaver and will keep you on track. Remember on the
ISEE, always guess. There’s no penalty for guessing so you can even take a
wild guess if you don’t know the answer. On the SSAT, guess after
eliminating at least 2 answer choices.

Here’s a bonus tip for you: Of course, the best way to excel on the SSAT
and ISEE with synonyms is to read all kinds of material, whether it be
literature, magazines, editorials, newspapers. Look up unfamiliar words
right away and add them to your growing vocabulary. You never know, you
might see one of those words on the ISEE or SSAT synonym portion. I hope
these power strategies will help you to get your best score on the synonym
section of the ISEE and the SSAT. Power-up and good luck.

Are you preparing for the SSAT or ISEE? Which of Terri’s power strategies did you find most helpful?

Post your tips/comments below.

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November 6th, 2013
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Mastering ISEE Synonyms

Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished teaches tricks and strategies for mastering the synonym portion of the ISEE test.

First, figure out the definition of the word before looking at the distracting answer choices. Dissect the word and figure out the roots of the word. If you’re not sure about the roots of the word, then use a positive, negative, neutral strategy to find a matching charge of the word.
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Finally, go to the answer choices, and eliminate the three wrong choices.

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi everyone, Alexis Avila, founder of Prepped and Polished LLC, here in
Boston, Massachusetts. Now one of the trickiest sections on the
independent school entrance examination, the ISEE test, especially for non-
native English speakers, is the synonym sections, but with a bit of help
learning tricks and strategies, you can easily make the ISEE synonym section
your most improved section.

Now the first thing that you want to do, is you want to come up with the
definition of the word before you look at the distracting answer choices.
So it’s okay if you don’t know the exact dictionary definition of each
synonym, as long as you can get the general essence of the word you’ll be
in great shape. So you do that by looking at the word’s roots. So in the
word excavate, there are two roots in this word, ex means exit, and cav,
root of cav means hull. Now if you don’t know the roots of a word, you can
still get the question right, try this approach. You might know that
excavate is not a positive word, like happy, it’s not negative word like
terror, it’s actually a neutral charge word, so if you know that, put a
neutral, a plus and minus, in parenthesis right next to the word, and when
you go to your answer choices, you’re going to eliminate any word that is
not a neutral word.

Okay, so now that you came up with some roots of the word, and you figured
out that excavate is a neutral charge word, let’s eliminate some choices.
Now we can eliminate in fact choice A, which is a negative word, and we can
eliminate C, pardon, which is a positively charged word, leaving us with
display and uncover. We’re going to go with choice D because uncover
closely mirrors the word excavate. So remember, if you take apart the
synonym and look for the roots and the charge of the word before you look
at the answer choices, then you’ll be in prime position to swiftly narrow
in on the correct answer. I wish you good luck and I’ll talk to you soon.

Did you find these ISEE Synonym tips helpful? What is your strongest/weakest section on the ISEE test?

Post your tips/comments below.

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October 26th, 2011
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