Posts Tagged ‘Study Tips’

Episode 117, 5 Ways to Get an A in School

On this tutoring tips episode #117, Tutor Anooj shows you how to get an A in school. Anooj was valedictorian of his high school class, so play close attention to these tips!
Tip 1: Always do your homework
Tip 2: Start preparing for exams at least 1-2 weeks in advance
Tip 3: Take notes in class
Tip 4: Prioritize items in class that count the most
Tip 5: Eat healthy, sleep well, exercise, and do fun things

Episode 117, 5 Ways to Get an A in School

For more information, visit: Prepped and Polished.com.

Please rate, review and subscribe to the show on iTunes!

What was your biggest takeaway from this podcast? Do you have any questions for Anooj and Alexis Avila?

Post your comments below:

SAT Prep

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March 30th, 2016
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5 Ways to Get an A in School

Tutor Anooj shows you how to get an A in school. Anooj was valedictorian of his high school class, so play close attention to these tips!
Tip 1: Always do your homework
Tip 2: Start preparing for exams at least 1-2 weeks in advance
Tip 3: Take notes in class
Tip 4: Prioritize items in class that count the most
Tip 5: Eat healthy, sleep well, exercise, and do fun things

What was your biggest takeaway from these tips? Do you have any questions for Anooj and Alexis Avila?

Post your comments below:

SAT Prep

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December 7th, 2015
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Executive Functioning Building Blocks: Creating a Weekly Schedule

Time Management: How to Make a Weekly Schedule

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Adam S. Executive Functioning Coach and Study Skills Tutor of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts teaches you how to build a weekly schedule and manage your time more efficiently.

1. Start with your obligations
2. Then fill in Homework Time
3. Make sure you include time for fun

Online tutoring services for Executive Functioning Coach

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi, guys. Adam S. here, with Prepped & Polished in [inaudible: 00:03],
Mass. Today, we are going to talk about how to build a schedule. It’s
really tough to keep everything in your head when you get into high school,
college. Organizational tools can be really valuable, if you use them:
Daily planners, log calendars; really valuable tools. You really want to
get yourself a good planner to start, planners and assignment notebooks.
You want to try and find a planner that has a 30-day view and a 7-day view.
Then you want to plug your big events coming up into the 30-day view, and
then look at those a week at a time and line them up in your 7-day view.
We’re going to talk a little bit about what that looks like. Let’s take it
over to the whiteboard.When it comes time to make your weekly schedule, you want to start by
filling in the stuff that you have no control over; they’re your
obligations. The time’s fixed, you have to be there. Basically, your job is
just to show up. That’ll be stuff like class, your history class, 9:00 to
10:00, math class, or practices for soccer; extracurricular activities,
appointments. That’s the skeleton of your schedule, and then you’re going
to plug the rest of your time in around that.Since school is your Number 1 priority, the next thing you want to think
about is homework. How do you think about how much homework time? A good
rule of thumb is you want 1 to 3 hours of homework time per hour of class
time. Say you’re taking 4 classes, and they each meet for 1 hour, 3 times a
week. You’re looking at 12 hours in total class time. That means you want
to budget for anywhere from 12 to 36 hours of homework time. That might
sound like a lot upfront, and you’re probably not always going to need that
much time, but you want to budget that much time so you know it’s there if
you need it.How are we going to use that time? Say I decided that this is going to be a
2-hour homework block. What I want to do is look at all my syllabuses for
my classes and make a list of all the homework I have to do for each class
that week. Say that I have math numbers 1 through 20; history, read pages
70 to 85. Keep going on down the list. Then you want to get a rough idea of
how much time each of these assignments is going to take. This is something
you’ll get a better sense for as time goes on. A good trick is to do a
small portion of it. Say you have to read 15 pages for history: Set a
timer, read 5 pages, stop the timer; see how long it took you, and then
divide that by 5. Say it took you 20 minutes; 20 / 5 = 4 minutes a page.
You have to read 15 pages; it’s going to be about an hour. You want to
budget for an hour of history reading, and then plug that into your
schedule in that homework time.How do we decide which homework to do when? You really want to prioritize
by a due date. If history is not due until Friday and math is due on
Tuesday, you want to plug math first; make sure you get math done Monday
night so it’s done in time for Tuesday, because you know you’ll have later
in the week to do that history homework. Another important point is to
think about breaking up larger projects into smaller projects. We can talk
about that more in a later video. If you have a big paper coming up, you
want to break that down into 1, 2 . . . maybe even 3 separate pieces, where
you do an outline, a draft, edits. It’s really overwhelming to try and do
any big project all at once, but if you can break it down into its
component pieces, and then take each piece and put that into a day in your
schedule, it’s much more manageable.It’s also really important to schedule fun stuff, too. When you think about
your schedule, if you know that playing Xbox is really important, make sure
you make time for Xbox. It gives you something to look forward to, it makes
the schedule more fun, and if you don’t make time for it, you’re just going
to take it out of other time when you’re supposed to be doing homework.
It’s really important to know yourself. Give yourself time for your
obligations: History, math, soccer, time for homework, and then time for
fun. It’s going to take you a little bit longer the first couple times you
do it, but it gets a lot easier, and in time, it becomes second nature. By
the second half of the semester, you won’t even think about it, and your
life is going to be a lot easier.

Those are the basics of building a schedule. Remember, you want to start
with your skeleton; your obligations. That’s your class time, your
extracurriculars, activities you have to go to. Then fill in your homework
time. Prioritize your subjects by due date, and try to assign realistic
time blocks to each assignment. Then make sure you include time for fun
because that’s important too. All right, guys. We’ll talk to you next time.

How do you currently manage your weekly schedule? Which of Adam’s tips did you find most useful?

Post your tips/comments below.

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September 18th, 2013
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Marathon Training and Test Preparation

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Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished, LLC located at 21 Eliot Street in South Natick, Massachusetts discusses similarities between marathon training and test preparation.

You do not want to jump into rigorous preparation at week one of a sixteen week training schedule. Rather, you want to prepare and build you miles/study harder and longer gradually.

Test Preparation

You don’t want to cram a few days before the test, nor do you want to run a 20 + mile run the week of the marathon!

On test day/marathon day, you want to move through the test steadily and pace yourself well.

Doing Test Prep Right! Marathon Training and Test Preparation Article

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hey, everyone. Alexis Avila, founder of Prepped and Polished LLC, here at our new office in South Natick, Massachusetts. Now studying for a standardized and preparing for a marathon are really quite similar. This April, I recently completed my first marathon in Boston, and believe me, it was not easy. To cross both finish lines, you have to spend a good four to five months preparing, doing smart preparation. So here are some similarities between marathon training and test preparation training.Now when you train for a marathon, you don’t want to, week one, go out of the gates and run a 20-miler. Okay? You’re going to collapse. It’s not going to work well. Similarly, when you train for a standardized test, you don’t want to dive right into rigorous preparation right away. You have to figure out what your strengths and weaknesses are. Get familiar with the test format, the types of questions you’re going to find on the test. Once you figure out the road map, then you can start to study harder and really crank up those miles. Now any marathon runner will tell you that if you run a 20 plus-miler the week of the actual marathon, you’re going to heighten your chance of injury. Similarly, you don’t want to cram for the SAT a few days before the big test. See, cramming for the SAT could hurt your concentration and injure you mentally on test day. See, if you spread out your SAT studying over a series of months and get some ample rest, you’ll put yourself in the best position to ace the exam.Okay, it’s the big day, and if you want to run a marathon, you have to run a smart race. That means on race day you got to hydrate well and run in a relaxed and comfortable pace. Now on test day, you don’t want to rush through the test and make a bunch of careless mistakes. That could hurt your score. Nor do you want to spend any significant amount of time on one problem. What you want to do is you want to move quickly but carefully through the easy problems at the beginning, and then you want to slow down when you encounter the medium and difficult problems. Now if you get stuck on any one given problem, you’re going to circle that problem and go back to it if you have time. Like a marathon, on a standardized test, you’ll score the best if you pace yourself wisely from start to finish. Okay, I wish you really good luck on your test preparation. And whether you prepare for a test or a marathon, just remember, prepare yourself well. I wish you good luck and I will talk to you soon.

Have you considered running a marathon? How else is marathon training similar to test preparation?

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June 19th, 2012
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Featured, Test Preparation Tips
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