Posts Tagged ‘SAT Boston’

May A. (Natick, MA)

“My daughter had a great experience preparing for the SATs. The tutor was extremely helpful, and fully engaging. She worked really hard, and improved tremendously (over 450 points), thanks to the approach and methodology used by Prepped & Polished.”

February 5th, 2014
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The 4 SAT Sentence Completion Strategies You MUST Know!

SAT Verbal Instructor Terri of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts gives a comprehensive overview of the four most important SAT sentence completion strategies.

1. Use logic to predict the missing word
2. Find the clues in the sentence

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3. Determine the connotation of the missing word
4. Plug in the answer choice and eliminate
Bonus Tip: Remember to always read the sentence after you have selected your answer choice to see if it makes sense!

Do you struggle with sentence completions? Which of Terri’s SAT sentence completion strategies did you find most helpful?

Post your tips/comments below.

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January 9th, 2014
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Featured, SAT Sentence Completions
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Five Tips to Master Sentence Improvements on the SAT Writing Section

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SAT Tutor Terri K. of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts teaches you five tips and one bonus tip for sentence improvements on the SAT writing section

1. Read the entire sentence carefully.
2. Don’t waste time reading choice A carefully.

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3. Do not read the choices on their own.
4. Aggressively identify common problem areas in the sentences.
5. Eliminate any answer choice that changes the meaning of the original sentence.

BONUS TIP: If you get into a jam, select the most concise answer.

Are you getting ready for the SAT? Which of Terri’s sentence improvement tips for SAT writing section did you find most helpful?

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Get instant FREE access to our SAT E-Book: 13 SAT Tips You Can NOT Live Without

Online SAT prep, online SAT E-Book, SAT tutoring online

December 4th, 2013
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Featured, SAT Grammar Writing
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Claudia A. (Milton, MA)

“Our SAT/ACT tutor was an outstanding teacher and a very pleasant and kind person. She worked well with our son, and the sessions were very productive. The overall experience was far superior to our experience with a company we contracted with for our older daughter.”

November 13th, 2013
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4 Tips for The Night Before and 4 Tips for the Morning of SAT Saturday

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It’s 24 hours until the SAT. This is what to do.

Alexis Avila Founder of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts, gives you Four Tips for The Night Before and 4 Tips for the Morning of SAT Saturday.

Friday
1. Pack the stuff that you’ll need for tomorrow
(admission ticket, photo ID, calculator with fresh batteries, two-three sharpened number two pencils with erasers, snacks and water, sweatshirt)
2. Know how to get to the testing site.
3. Eat well and relax tonight. Watch a movie or read. Study vocab only-flashcards or online vocab on quizlet.com
4. Rest and get to bed early

Test Preparation

Saturday
1. Wake up early
2. Grab a breakfast. Nothing too greasy. Waffles, muffins, bagels, cereal (not Lucky Charms ☺)
3. Do a couple of easy math problems to wake up the brain or memorize ten vocab words
4. Leave for the test site early

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Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hey, guys, Alexis Avila, Prepped and Polished. So your SATs are tomorrow
and I want to give you some tips. So here are four tips for today, for
Friday, four tips for Saturday morning.Tip one, what I want you to do is pack the stuff all in one backpack. The
stuff that you need for tomorrow. Pack your admission ticket. Pack a photo
ID. Calculator, make sure that there are some fresh batteries in there. Two
to three sharpened number 2 pencils with erasers. Snacks and water. Bring a
sweatshirt. I am a Michigan fan so I am going to bring my Michigan
sweatshirt but you can bring whatever sweatshirt you prefer.Tip number two, know how to get to the test site. I know somebody who got
to the test site late, didn’t know how to get there, came to the SAT late
and only had ten minutes to do his essay. You don’t want to be that person.Tip number three, eat well and relax tonight, Friday night. Have a good
meal. Relax means like watch a movie, read. Don’t go to a party. Stay at
home, rent a movie. Maybe, go out to a 5:00 one but don’t go to like a
seven and come back at ten. And get to bed early. Don’t cram for the test.
You can study vocab because vocabulary is not going to fry your brain. It’s
going to keep you sharp and quick and if you want to join our online vocab
program, shoot me an email.

Tip 4 is rest and get to bed early. Don’t go to bed late. I want you to get
to bed at a reasonable time, maybe even a little earlier than you usually
do. So you can kind of get your body relaxed and fall asleep, and get ample
rest. You are going to need it for tomorrow morning.

Now four tips for Saturday. I want you to wake up early. You are not going
to be too stressed because you’ve already packed your backpack, right? So
you are not going to be scrounging around looking for stuff.

Tip 2, grab a good breakfast. A good breakfast means nothing with too much
fat, nothing with too much sugar because you’re just going to crash and
burn. I want you to grab some waffles, muffins, bagels, some cereal. Don’t
get Lucky Charms. Don’t get eggs and bacon. Save that for after as a
reward.

Tip 3 is do a couple of easy math problems to wake up the brain, keep you
sharp. Or you can memorize ten vocabulary words just to kind of get your
brain moving in the morning.

And then Tip number 4, I want you to leave for the test site early. You
don’t want to get there late again. The really late ones will end up in the
worst room, the cold room probably. So just get there early and when I say
early, 15 minutes early.

Everything is going to go well. I wish you good luck and I will talk to you
soon.

Are you ready for the SAT? What other questions or comments do you have about last minute preparation?

Post your tips/comments below.

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March 7th, 2013
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Avoid These Four Common SAT Math Exponent Rule Mistakes

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You will need to learn the exponent rules in preparation for the SAT. http://www.preppedandpolished.com Alexis Avila Founder of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts, teaches you the exponent rules and shows you the four common mistakes many people make with exponent rules.

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Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hey, everyone. Alexis Avila; Prepped & Polished, LLC, South Natick,
Massachusetts. A lot of students over the years, they keep making the same
exponent mistakes. I’m going to go through some of the exponent rules so
you don’t make the same mistakes I see kids make over and over again. Let’s
get these rules straight once and for all. Let’s go to the board.One of the exponent rules students confuse is if you have X2 xX3; you have
the same coefficient here and you’re just multiplying. X2 x X3, students
will multiply the exponents. They’ll say X2 x X3 = X6. That’s wrong. You
don’t do that. Let’s get this straight once and for all. It’s X2 x X3, you
add the exponents when you’re multiplying two of the same coefficient. X2 x
X3 = X2+3; X5. You add the exponents when you multiply exponents with the
same bases.Another exponent rule students confuse is if you take X3 and you raise X3
to the 4th power. What they often do wrong is they will add these
exponents; they’ll just say that’s X7. That’s wrong. Let’s get this
straight once and for all. If you have an exponent and you’re raising it to
another exponent . . . if you have X3 all raised to the 4th, that’s when
you multiply the exponents. It’s the same as X3x4, or X12, final answer.

Sometimes, students make this mistake: If you have division with exponents.
If you have the same base for a numerator and denominator, but it’s X6 /
X3. Sometimes, students will say, “I’m just going to divide those
exponents.” What they say wrong is they’ll say it’s X6/3. X6/3 = X2. That
is completely wrong, do not do that. What you want to do when you divide
exponents, you subtract the exponents from one another. X6 / X3 is the same
thing as X6-3; X3, final answer.

One last error I want to show you, that students often make, is if you have
(2X)3. What students often do wrong is they will only apply the exponent to
the X. They’ll say “That is 2X3, final answer.” That is completely false.
Do not do that. What you’re going to do is apply the exponent to each
entity in the parentheses. The answer to (2X)3 is the same thing is 23 x X3
= 8X3, final answer.

Just go over those 4 rules I taught you, and you shouldn’t make any
careless mistakes when you see an exponent problem on the SAT. Good luck on
your test. I’ll talk to you soon.

Do the exponent rules confuse you? Which of the exponent rules trips you up the most?

Post your tips/comments below.

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October 5th, 2012
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Featured, SAT Math
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Steve S. (Newton, MA)

“A friend of mine whose children had worked with Prepped and Polished recommended Alexis to me when my daughter was looking for some “fine-tuning” on her test scores. Alexis worked with my daughter during the summer, not just on math problems but also on general test preparation and strategy. Her scores improved; she will be attending her first-choice college in the fall, and our experience with Alexis and PnP was very professional and productive!”

February 14th, 2012
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SAT Math Workshop

Alexis Avila, Founder/President of Prepped & Polished, LLC will provide students with a review of the types of mathematical problems found on the SAT and offers test-taking strategies for the exam. We will review algebra and geometry, focusing on students’ specific needs and areas of difficulty, and utilize actual SAT practice test problems. Emphasis will be placed on what to practice in preparation for the exam, how to practice, and strategies to help maximize your score. Students are encouraged to bring questions. Please bring a calculator, pencil, and notebook to class.

Register Here

September 24th, 2011
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ACT or SAT

Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished helps you decide whether to take the ACT or SAT, or both.

If you want a more straightforward format, no guessing penalty, and don’t mind science then go for the ACT test. If you prefer a test that requires more logic and you have the time and money to have a tutor teach you the techniques and strategies necessary to beat the SAT, then go for the SAT test.

Test Preparation

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi, everyone, Alexis Avila, founder of Prepped and Polished LLC here in
Boston. Now, the ACT or the SAT, most colleges accept either test. So which
one should you choose? Well, there are pros and cons for each test, so
let’s get to them.

The ACT has no guessing penalty. The SAT has a quarter point deduction for
wrong answers. The ACT has four answer choices except on the math. It has
five. The SAT has five answer choices throughout the test. So what does
that mean? Well, that means if you have test anxiety, get nervous during
tests, you might want to go ACT, because there’s just less things to worry
about. There’s no guessing penalty and there’s less answer choices.

Okay, what else? The ACT with essay writing is three hours and 20 minutes
long. Now, if you decide not to take the ACT without the essay, subtract 30
minutes from that. The SAT has an essay always, and it’s three hours and 45
minutes always. So it’s a longer test than the ACT. So if you’re a student
who gets easily distracted, you might want to go ACT. It’s a shorter test.

The ACT has one section per component. It has one English section, it has
one math, one reading, one science, and then you don’t see it ever again.
The SAT has three sections per component, and it’s kind of in random order.
There’s some predictability, but for the most part the sections are
peppered in random order.

The ACT is a more academic-oriented test. So what does that mean? Well,
that means that if you’re a solid student — academic student — you’ll
probably do well on the ACT. But what it also means is that you don’t
necessarily need a tutor to help you prepare for the ACT. As long as you
are a self-motivated student, you can take many ACT practice tests, learn
ACT content, and you’ll better your score.

The SAT, though, is a more logic-oriented based test, and the help of a
tutor can help your score a lot. Now, you’ll need money to hire a good
tutor, so just keep that in mind. If you have the money to do it, hire one.
A SAT tutor will teach you the tips and strategies necessarily to overcome
that guessing penalty obstacle that you find on the SAT.

Okay, so overall, if you want a more straightforward test, no guessing
penalty, and you don’t mind science, then go ACT. But just keep in mind, on
the ACT, the science section is not that bad science. It’s more like
reading charts and graphs. So it’s not profound science at all, so don’t
let that deter you from taking the ACT. But if you want a more
straightforward test, go ACT. If you want a more logic test, and you have
the money to hire a good tutor to help you learn tricks and strategies, go
SAT.

Now, a final parting shot. If you don’t know which test to take, take a
practice test for the ACT and the SAT, score it, and then you’ll know which
test to take. Maybe you’ll take both.

I wish you good luck, and I’ll talk to you soon.

Are you considering the ACT or the SAT test? Is one test better than the other?

Post your tips/comments below.

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July 13th, 2011
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ACT, SAT
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How to Avoid Careless Mistakes on SAT Sentence Error Questions

Tips for SAT Sentence Error Questions

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Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished offers advice on how to avoid careless mistakes on the SAT Sentence Error Questions on the SAT Writing Grammar Section.

Before circling an answer because it sounds wrong, come up with a valid replacement for the incorrect grammar.

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi everyone, Alexis Avila found of Prepped and Polished LLC here in Boston.
Now 18 out of the 49 grammar questions on the SAT are sentence error
questions. What a lot of students do, of all levels, is they tend to read
the question, and then if something sounds funny in the sentence, they’ll
circle the answer and then they’ll just move on.

If you want to avoid careless mistakes on the sentence error portion of the
test, you have to work really methodically. So this is what I recommend
that you do with sentence error questions. You want to first read the
sentence and narrow in on the bad grammar.

So “Martha is the woman who sat on the couch.” that sounds pretty good,
“between you and I at the meeting, and who kept asking questions about
American Idol.” Well, we know that after a preposition between, you can’t
have the subject case pronoun after a preposition. So this is what I want
you to do. Instead of just choosing B because it sounds funny, I want you
to really know why we are going to choose B. So I want you to have a valid
replacement for the answer.

So after the preposition between, the pronoun shouldn’t be you and I, it
should be you and me. You need the object case form of the pronoun after a
preposition. So before you actually go ahead and choose B, I want you to
slash the incorrect answer, slash the mistake, and replace it with the
correct grammar. Then choose B and move on confidently through the sentence
error portion of the test. So do those things, and I guarantee you’re avoid
careless mistakes on the sentence errors.

I’ll talk to you soon.

Did you find this SAT Grammar tip helpful? What are some other ways to avoid careless grammar mistakes on the SAT?

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May 18th, 2011
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SAT Grammar Writing
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