Posts Tagged ‘College Apps’

Episode 94: Elizabeth Dankoski, How a Perfect SAT Score Can Backfire on You

See our interview on Video here!

Alexis Avila talks host of The Prepped & Polished podcast talks to Elizabeth Dankoski

For the past 15 years, Elizabeth has worked as a private college consultant, helping students get into incredible schools: Harvard, MIT, Columbia, Yale, Caltech, Dartmouth, and many, many others. Elizabeth has a Bachelors from Wellesley College Magna Cum Laude. Elizabeth is founder of the Dream School Project, a powerful mentoring program created for high-achieving high school students who want to get into the school of their dreams. Elizabeth created The Dream School Project as an antidote to all of the anxiety and stress around the admissions process.

On today’s episode, Elizabeth gives her take on college admissions mania and based on her experience, what it REALLY takes to get into elite colleges.

Takeaways:

Get the book “How to be a High School Superstar” by Cal Newport. If you want to get into top schools, you need to be INTERESTING

Elizabeth’s next enrollment into her mastermind group is early 2016. Spaces fill up quickly! Her mastermind helps kids find mentors and find opportunities to find interests and flourish.

Two college admissions myths:

  1. Your grades don’t have to be perfect. If you spend too much time on perfection you don’t have time to distinguish yourself.
  2. Just because an elite college is a top 20 in the US News Rankings, it doesn’t mean it’s necessarily the right FIT school for you.

Elizabeth’s Three Take home tips:

  1. Ask yourself what do you love to do and how can I make an impact
  2. Find a mentor (seek an older person who can help you think BIGGER)
  3. Go out there and DO what interests you

Episode 94: Elizabeth Dankoski, How a Perfect SAT Score Can Backfire on You

For more information, visit: Prepped and Polished.com.

Please rate, review and subscribe to the show on iTunes!

What was your biggest takeaway from this podcast? Do you have any questions for Elizabeth Dankoski and Alexis Avila?

Post your comments below:

SAT Prep

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September 10th, 2015
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ACT, College Admissions Tips, College Tips, Featured, Podcast, SAT
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Five Theater Program College Application Essay Tips

Essay Expert for College Theater Programs gives College Application Essay Tips By Rosie Colosi, Essay Expert, Prepped & Polished, LLC

You brush past the curtain as you walk onstage, the floorboards creaking as your nervous feet propel you forward. You feel the heat of the spotlight as it hits your face. Your throat dries and your palms sweat as you prepare to sing. You open your mouth and…and…

If you are applying to a theater program, this scenario probably strikes excitement instead of fear in your heart. You yearn for a life upon the wicked stage and desperately hope to gain admission to a top-notch program that will equip you for a successful career in NY or LA.
But before you see your name in lights, you need to see your name on an acceptance letter.

You must go through the regular college application process, score well on your tests, and complete a performance audition. And of course, you must write an essay convincing the admissions committee that you are the next Kristin Chenoweth or Norbert Leo Butz.

Hate writing? No problem! Here’s the pot of gold at the end of Finian’s rainbow: The audition skills you have acquired on your theatrical journey will help you in your essay writing process. Read on…

1. Pick the right song
If you’re an alto, you wouldn’t sing “My White Knight” from Music Man for an audition. If you’re a tall leading man, you wouldn’t sing “Make ‘Em Laugh” from Singin’ in the Rain. You would choose a song that suits your voice, personality, and appearance. Do the same thing with your essay. Pick a topic that is important to you, that means something, that tells the reader who you are. You know how voice coaches are always telling you to “sing what you love”? Well, write what you love. It’s that simple.

2. Practice, practice, practice
You would never audition for a lead in the play after listening to your audition song once, right? You’d listen to the song, find the sheet music, sing it in your room, and maybe even rehearse in front of a coach or friend. Incorporate those good habits into your writing process. Don’t submit an essay you typed in a hurry one afternoon. Allow ample time to write, revise, edit, adjust…then share with a writing coach, a trusted friend, or a supportive teacher. Outside perspectives will help perfect your ideas.

3. Hit all the right notes
It’s every performer’s worst nightmare: prepping to sing a glorious, operatic high note…but a clunker comes out of your mouth instead. To prevent that, we aim to sing right in the center of the note, we set specific breathing patterns, count note values—and all of that’s even before we add emotion. Similarly, the mechanics of grammar, spelling, and sentence structure must be on point in your essay. Misspelling a word in your first sentence can be as detrimental as singing that clunker, so do your homework on your writing mechanics—don’t just rely on spell check.

4. Be confident
You might shout to the rooftops that you’re best singer that ever lived. Or you might downplay your talent to strangers. Find some middle ground between these two extremes. Your essay should tell your dream college that you’re pretty awesome, but bragging will rub the panel the wrong way. It’s a fine, fine line between Kate Monster and Lucy T. Slut (I’m not being crude; it’s an Avenue Q reference!), so balance confidence with humility.

5. Keep breathing
You can’t sing unless you breathe. And you certainly can’t write unless you breathe. The college application process can get hugely stressful and overwhelming, but hyperventilating never helped anyone. A little dose of butterflies in your stomach can be a good thing for performers, and you may get similarly excited and scared about college, but channel that energy into your work. Do a few breathing exercises from your voice lessons before you sit down to write. Seriously. Some extra lip trills never hurt anyone…and they might even help you write your way into Carnegie Mellon.

Rosie Colosi, college essay expert and creator of Write With Rosie, earned an M.A. in English Lit from Boston College and a B.A. in English Lit from SUNY Geneseo. She has written 12 nonfiction books for Scholastic Inc., and she has performed on stages from Alaska to Athens. Most recently, she played Mrs. Claus in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular Starring the Rockettes in New York City.

Are you applying to theater schools? How is your theater program essay coming along?

Post your tips/comments below.

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September 10th, 2013
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