Posts Tagged ‘Careless’

Avoid These Four Common SAT Math Exponent Rule Mistakes

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You will need to learn the exponent rules in preparation for the SAT. http://www.preppedandpolished.com Alexis Avila Founder of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts, teaches you the exponent rules and shows you the four common mistakes many people make with exponent rules.

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Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hey, everyone. Alexis Avila; Prepped & Polished, LLC, South Natick,
Massachusetts. A lot of students over the years, they keep making the same
exponent mistakes. I’m going to go through some of the exponent rules so
you don’t make the same mistakes I see kids make over and over again. Let’s
get these rules straight once and for all. Let’s go to the board.One of the exponent rules students confuse is if you have X2 xX3; you have
the same coefficient here and you’re just multiplying. X2 x X3, students
will multiply the exponents. They’ll say X2 x X3 = X6. That’s wrong. You
don’t do that. Let’s get this straight once and for all. It’s X2 x X3, you
add the exponents when you’re multiplying two of the same coefficient. X2 x
X3 = X2+3; X5. You add the exponents when you multiply exponents with the
same bases.Another exponent rule students confuse is if you take X3 and you raise X3
to the 4th power. What they often do wrong is they will add these
exponents; they’ll just say that’s X7. That’s wrong. Let’s get this
straight once and for all. If you have an exponent and you’re raising it to
another exponent . . . if you have X3 all raised to the 4th, that’s when
you multiply the exponents. It’s the same as X3x4, or X12, final answer.

Sometimes, students make this mistake: If you have division with exponents.
If you have the same base for a numerator and denominator, but it’s X6 /
X3. Sometimes, students will say, “I’m just going to divide those
exponents.” What they say wrong is they’ll say it’s X6/3. X6/3 = X2. That
is completely wrong, do not do that. What you want to do when you divide
exponents, you subtract the exponents from one another. X6 / X3 is the same
thing as X6-3; X3, final answer.

One last error I want to show you, that students often make, is if you have
(2X)3. What students often do wrong is they will only apply the exponent to
the X. They’ll say “That is 2X3, final answer.” That is completely false.
Do not do that. What you’re going to do is apply the exponent to each
entity in the parentheses. The answer to (2X)3 is the same thing is 23 x X3
= 8X3, final answer.

Just go over those 4 rules I taught you, and you shouldn’t make any
careless mistakes when you see an exponent problem on the SAT. Good luck on
your test. I’ll talk to you soon.

Do the exponent rules confuse you? Which of the exponent rules trips you up the most?

Post your tips/comments below.

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October 5th, 2012
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Featured, SAT Math
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How to Avoid Careless Mistakes on SAT Sentence Error Questions

Tips for SAT Sentence Error Questions

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Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished offers advice on how to avoid careless mistakes on the SAT Sentence Error Questions on the SAT Writing Grammar Section.

Before circling an answer because it sounds wrong, come up with a valid replacement for the incorrect grammar.

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi everyone, Alexis Avila found of Prepped and Polished LLC here in Boston.
Now 18 out of the 49 grammar questions on the SAT are sentence error
questions. What a lot of students do, of all levels, is they tend to read
the question, and then if something sounds funny in the sentence, they’ll
circle the answer and then they’ll just move on.

If you want to avoid careless mistakes on the sentence error portion of the
test, you have to work really methodically. So this is what I recommend
that you do with sentence error questions. You want to first read the
sentence and narrow in on the bad grammar.

So “Martha is the woman who sat on the couch.” that sounds pretty good,
“between you and I at the meeting, and who kept asking questions about
American Idol.” Well, we know that after a preposition between, you can’t
have the subject case pronoun after a preposition. So this is what I want
you to do. Instead of just choosing B because it sounds funny, I want you
to really know why we are going to choose B. So I want you to have a valid
replacement for the answer.

So after the preposition between, the pronoun shouldn’t be you and I, it
should be you and me. You need the object case form of the pronoun after a
preposition. So before you actually go ahead and choose B, I want you to
slash the incorrect answer, slash the mistake, and replace it with the
correct grammar. Then choose B and move on confidently through the sentence
error portion of the test. So do those things, and I guarantee you’re avoid
careless mistakes on the sentence errors.

I’ll talk to you soon.

Did you find this SAT Grammar tip helpful? What are some other ways to avoid careless grammar mistakes on the SAT?

Post your tips/comments below.

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May 18th, 2011
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Posted in
SAT Grammar Writing
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How to Avoid Careless Mistakes – Tips for SAT Math Mistakes

Tips for SAT Math Mistakes

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Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished offers advice on how to avoid careless mistakes on the math portion of the SAT test.

Underlining or circling the key words in the math question will help you to avoid careless mistakes by forcing you to read the problem carefully and know exactly what you are looking for.

Test Preparation

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi everyone, Alexis Avila, founder of Prepped and Polished LLC. Now many
SAT students, even top level SAT students, make careless mistakes on their
SAT, especially on the math section.

Now remember if you make ten careless mistakes on the SAT math section,
that can cost you between 100 and 150 points, so you want to avoid careless
mistakes and this is how you do it. You’re going to underline and circle or
box key words in the math question.

For example, if A equals 2 x 4 x 6 x 8 and B equals 6 x 8, what’s the
remainder when A is divided by B. So what’s important in this question,
well, we need to know A so we’ve underlined that, and B is 6 x 8, what is
the remainder? I’m going to circle the remainder when A is divided by B.
Now you’re going to solve the question really carefully.

You’re going to clearly take A and divide it by B. So we’re going to say 2
x 4 x 6 x 8 divided by 6 x 8 which is B, we’re going to cancel and then
we’re going to solve and see that when A is divided by B you get 8. Now
this is where a lot of students make a mistake, even top level students.
They’re going to get so excited and wrapped around the fact that they
solved the question that A is 8 that they are going to circle E.

We’re going careful work and so we know that we are looking for the
remainder, and the remainder is clearly zero, there is no remainder when A
is divided by B. You’re going to circle A and move on. We’ve done careful
work. Now what you’re going to do to avoid careless mistakes in the math
section is you’re going to underline or circle key concepts, key words in
the math question. And then you’re going to reread the question and know
exactly what to look for in the SAT question.

I wish you good luck, and I’ll talk to you soon.

Did you find this SAT Math tip helpful? What are some other ways to avoid careless math mistakes on the SAT?

Post your tips/comments below.

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April 20th, 2011
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SAT Math
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