Posts Tagged ‘ACT Science’

ACT Science Strategies: Rainbow Technique and Variable Chart

In this video, ACT instructor Stephanie describes two powerful strategies for focusing on what’s important on an ACT science passage.

What was your biggest takeaway from this video tutorial about powerful strategies for focusing on what’s important on an ACT science passage? Do you have any question for Stephanie and Alexis Avila?

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October 28th, 2016
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Episode 53: Prep Like Malcolm Butler… Excel On ACT Science

Are you nervous about taking the ACT? Well have no fear; on today’s Tutoring Tips show, Terri Karol shows you how to excel on the ACT science, drawing parallels to New England Patriots Malcolm Butler’s preparation on the football field.

ep 53 ACT Science

What was your biggest takeaway from this podcast? Do you have any questions for Terri Karol or Alexis Avila?

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March 31st, 2015
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Prep Like Malcolm Butler-Excel on the ACT Science

In this blog ACT Instructor Terri shows you how to excel on the ACT science, drawing parallels to New England Patriots Malcolm Butler’s preparation on the football field.

Terri will show you
1. format and pacing
2. how the questions appear in three different formats
3. strategies to help you execute your gameplan

Are you taking the ACT in 2016? Any follow up qs about the ACT Science section?

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February 27th, 2015
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Gary R. (Boston, MA)

“We hired Alexis and Prepped & Polished to help prepare our son for the ACT test. Before Prepped & Polished our son came in with a 21 (55%) ACT. Alexis set up a rigorous tutoring plan over several months which composed of twelve tutoring meetings, homework assignments, and nine practice tests. Alexis was clear of his expectations and our son was responsive to the tuteladge. The end result was a game changer for my son’s college prospects. Our son took the April and June ACT tests and super scored a cumulative of a 29, with a high of 31 on both the reading and the math (93% and 96% respectively). Thanks to Prepped & Polished, my son is confident that he will get into a top-tier university.”

June 25th, 2013
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Avoid This Typical ACT Science Mistake

Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts teaches you how to avoid careless ACT Science mistakes.

Pace yourself well, read the ACT questions carefully, and re-arrange the tables if needed.

To sign up for the ACT go to the Official ACT Website

ACT Science Tips

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi everyone. Alexis Avila, Prepped & Polished LLC here at South Natick, Massachusetts.ACT Science section is one of the trickier sections on the ACT test. Half the battle to doing well on the ACT Science is pacing yourself wisely. You’ve got 35 minutes to do roughly 40 questions. You basically want to spend about five minutes per passage. There are seven passages. You have to read the questions really carefully. A lot of students make mistakes on the easier science ACT questions.Let’s go to the whiteboard. I’ll want to show you one of these questions students often miss. Here is a pretty typical data representation of an ACT Science question. So which graph best illustrates the relationship between heat released by foods and the change in water temperature? Here are your four graphs.So what you have to do is go to Table 1, make sense of the information and translate this information from the table to a graph. Now, what a lot of students will do is they’ll see the four different types of foods in the table, right? Bread, cheese, egg and potato, all the same mass. And then they’ll see that the change in water temperature goes up and then it goes down so they automatically assume that the graph is going to fluctuate. So they are going to deduce that it’s either F or G.

But this is not a fluctuating graph. This is a linear graph because if you start with the least amount of change of water temperature, it’s the potato at 2.7 degrees Celsius. And then you work your way to the egg, 5.6 Celsius and then to bread and then the cheese. So if you notice the output, the heat released for the smallest change in temperature is 3.2 kilojoules. So it’s like about right here. And then you go over to the egg, 5.6 degrees Celsius is the change in water temperature. It renders 6.7 kilojoules.

Then you go to the next food source, which is the bread at 8.3 degrees Celsius, and
it renders 10 kilojoules heat released. And then finally, the highest degree of water
temperature change is the cheese at 14.1 Celsius rendering 17 kilojoules of heat released.

You have to put the graph back into order from least to greatest change of water temperature and then see what the outcomes are. And clearly, this is a linear relationship between the two. Go with choice G.

So remember, guys. Half the battle to doing well on the ACT Science is pacing yourself well and reading the questions really carefully, rearranging the tables if needed. So I wish you good luck in your ACT test, and I will talk to you soon.

Are you ready for the ACT Science Section? What other questions or comments do you have about last minute ACT preparation?

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May 30th, 2013
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Five Key Steps to Mastering ACT Science

ACT Science
By The P&P Test Preparation Team, Prepped & Polished, LLC

The ACT differentiates itself from the SAT by including a science section along with the English, math and reading sections. The science portion of the exam is graded on a scale from 1 to 36 just like the other parts of the test and counts every bit as much towards your final score. You will have 35 minutes to complete 40 questions concerning 7 different passages. Because you have only a small amount of time to deal with so many passages, time management and efficiency are very important. Luckily, you do not have to know the first thing about science to score well on this test. Just follow these steps and you will have a solid grasp on the challenges presented by this section.

1. Know your passage types
The science section throws three basic passage types your way. You will encounter around three chart based “data representation” passages that tend to be easy in difficulty, about three experiment based “research summary” passages that are moderate in difficulty and one argument based “conflicting viewpoint” passage that is usually challenging in difficulty. Once you learn how to identify these passage types at a glance, you will be able navigate the section with a greater degree of confidence.

2. Know which scientific subjects you find the most engaging.
If you have a personal interest in a given subject covered by a passage, you will have a better opportunity to comprehend its text and data. A passage type’s difficulty tells us only so much. Your personal interests play a big part in determining which questions you find easy and which you find difficult. It does not matter if a passage on astronomy is generally seen as hard, if that subject is one of your favorites, you will do well on it.

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3. Complete easier passages first.
You have a strictly limited amount of time to complete the science section and may not be able to attempt every question. Ideally any problems you do not have a chance to look at will be the most difficult on the exam. By combining the first two steps and gaining an understanding of the section’s structure and what your personal strengths are, you can order the passages so that you save the most difficult ones for last.

4. Look for patterns.
The charts and graphs on the science section act in only two roles, there will always be either a pattern in a given data table or correlation between that table and another also attached to the passage. There will also always be questions that test your ability to recognize these patterns. It is very easy for one to zone out when reading dry charts full of stuffy terminology. If you remember that you do not have to understand the scientific concepts in the charts and only have to find patterns, then you will save yourself a lot of time and mental strain.

5. Keep track of who says what in conflicting viewpoint passages
Conflicting viewpoint passages give students fits because they do not come with helpful charts and require test-takers to keep track of what two or more people/groups/theories say about a given topic. As you read these passages you should constantly take notes and/or underline text that helps you keep track of who says what. If you can stay on top of which author or theory makes which claims, you will be able to avoid the confusion that makes conflicting viewpoint passages “hard”.

Bonus: Never leave questions blank on your score sheet.
There is no guessing penalty on the ACT, so every time you leave a question blank you give points back to the test. It is good to be generous, but not in this case.

Did you find these ACT Science tips helpful? Which tip resonated with you the most?

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March 16th, 2012
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