Archive for the ‘SAT Math’ Category

How to Crush Math Questions Involving Radians on the New SAT

SAT Instructor Dan M. shows you a how to solve math questions involving radians on the new SAT.

What was your biggest takeaway from this video tutorial about How to Crush Math Questions Involving Radians on the New SAT? Do you have any question for DAN and Alexis Avila?

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SAT Prep

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November 10th, 2016
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A Shortcut for Solving System of Equations Math Questions on the New SAT

SAT Instructor Dan M. shows you a shortcut method for solving system of equations math qs on the New SAT.

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August 22nd, 2016
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Don’t Have a Function Freakout! .. On the New SAT Math Section

SAT Instructor Dan M. shows you a how to solve function math questions on the new SAT.

Don’t Have a Function Freakout! .. On the New SAT Math Section

What was your biggest takeaway from this SAT math tutorial? Do you have any SAT math questions for Dan and Alexis Avila?

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July 18th, 2016
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How to Solve Complex Math Questions Quicker on the New SAT

SAT Instructor Dan M. shows you three examples of complex SAT Math problems that can be solved quickly using math strategies.
Things you will learn include:
1. Look to simplify and cancel out like terms
2. Remember your exponent rules and always try to get bases the same
3. Don’t overanalyze graphs
4. When roman numerals are involved, answer one roman numeral at a time and eliminate as you go.

What was your biggest takeaway from these strategies? Do you have any SAT math questions for Dan and Alexis Avila?

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June 14th, 2016
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All About Acing the SAT Math 2 Subject Test

On this tutoring tips episode of The Prepped and Polished Podcast, SAT Instructor Anooj shows you how to ace your SAT Math 2 Subject Test. Anooj scored an 800 on the Math 2 test, so pay close attention to his tips! In this video you will learn the following:

  1. Study and Practice
  2. Diagnose your weaknesses
  3. Calculator Tips

Episode 105, How to Get an 800 on the SAT Math 2 Subject Test

For more information, visit: Prepped and Polished.com.

Please rate, review and subscribe to the show on iTunes!

What was your biggest takeaway from this podcast? Do you have any questions for Adrianne Meldrum and Alexis Avila?

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January 12th, 2016
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Episode 97, Avoid These Four Common SAT and ACT Math Exponent Rule Mistakes

You will need to learn the exponent rules in preparation for the SAT and ACT tests. http://www.preppedandpolished.com Alexis Avila Founder of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts, teaches you the exponent rules and shows you the four common mistakes many people make with exponent rules.

Episode 97, Avoid These Four Common SAT and ACT Math Exponent Rule Mistakes

For more information, visit: Prepped and Polished.com.

Please rate, review and subscribe to the show on iTunes!

What was your biggest takeaway from this podcast? Do you have any questions for Alexis Avila?

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October 6th, 2015
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How to Get an 800 on the SAT Math 2 Subject Test

Prepped & Polished SAT Instructor Anooj shows you how to ace your SAT Math 2 Subject Test. Anooj scored an 800 on the Math 2 test, so pay close attention to his tips! In this video you will learn the following:

  1. Study and Practice
  2. Diagnose your weaknesses
  3. Calculator Tips

 

For more information, visit: Prepped and Polished.com.

What was your biggest takeaway from these tips? Do you have any questions for Anooj and Alexis Avila?

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September 28th, 2015
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Which Should I Take, The SAT Math Level 1 or Math Level 2?

SAT Math Level 1 or Math Level 2

Prepped & Polished SAT Math Tutor

By Alexa M., SAT Math Tutoring Instructor, Prepped & Polished, LLC

This question comes up regularly, and the short answer is: it doesn’t matter. Take whichever test you feel you can do well on. Really. Even MIT does not require that you take the Math 2, though they do insist you take one of the two math tests. Unless you claim on your application that you intend to be a math, physics, or other math-intensive major, your choice of test is unlikely to make a significant difference to your application.

The College Board’s official statement on the matter is: “If you have taken trigonometry or elementary functions (precalculus) or both, received grades of B or better in these courses, and are comfortable knowing when and how to use a scientific or graphing calculator, you should select the Level 2 test. If you are sufficiently prepared to take Level 2, but elect to take Level 1 in hopes of receiving a higher score, you may not do as well as you expect. You may want to consider taking the test that covers the topics you learned most recently, since the material will be fresh in your mind.”

Test Preparation

It is useful to be aware of the fact that scores on the two tests are not comparable. Because the Math 2 is taken primarily by those who would describe themselves as “math people”, the overall scores tend to be higher. A 700 on the Math 2 will put you at around the 50th percentile. Fortunately, colleges know this, but it can be a bit of a shock when you receive your scores (especially if you are a self-described “math person”)!

What are the differences between the two tests?

• The Math 1 directly covers plane geometry, which the Math 2 doesn’t cover at all.
• The Math 2 emphasizes a number of major topics that aren’t covered on the Math 1:
o Series
o Vectors
o Properties of complex numbers, not just their arithmetic
o Logarithms
o Parametric equations
o Polar Coordinates
o Coordinate geometry in three dimensions
o A great deal more trigonometry (graphs of trigonometric functions, radians, Laws of Sines and Cosines, trigonometric equations)
o Standard deviation

If you’ve covered the topics on the Math 2, you may want to sign up for the more advanced test. You can change your mind (and your tutoring!) up to two weeks before the test, so there is no harm in starting to prepare for the Math 2 and then deciding you are not ready for it.

Below is a more detailed chart of the differences between the two tests:

Difference between the SAT Math Level 1 and Level 2 Test

Alexa graduated from Reed College and earned a Master’s degree in math from the University of Pennsylvania. She has tutored students at every age and level from 10 to adult and from basic math through AP calculus, multivariate calculus and beyond.

Are you gearing up for the Math Level 1 or Level 2 Test?

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April 12th, 2013
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Avoid These Four Common SAT Math Exponent Rule Mistakes

You will need to learn the exponent rules in preparation for the SAT. http://www.preppedandpolished.com Alexis Avila Founder of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts, teaches you the exponent rules and shows you the four common mistakes many people make with exponent rules.

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Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hey, everyone. Alexis Avila; Prepped & Polished, LLC, South Natick,
Massachusetts. A lot of students over the years, they keep making the same
exponent mistakes. I’m going to go through some of the exponent rules so
you don’t make the same mistakes I see kids make over and over again. Let’s
get these rules straight once and for all. Let’s go to the board.One of the exponent rules students confuse is if you have X2 xX3; you have
the same coefficient here and you’re just multiplying. X2 x X3, students
will multiply the exponents. They’ll say X2 x X3 = X6. That’s wrong. You
don’t do that. Let’s get this straight once and for all. It’s X2 x X3, you
add the exponents when you’re multiplying two of the same coefficient. X2 x
X3 = X2+3; X5. You add the exponents when you multiply exponents with the
same bases.Another exponent rule students confuse is if you take X3 and you raise X3
to the 4th power. What they often do wrong is they will add these
exponents; they’ll just say that’s X7. That’s wrong. Let’s get this
straight once and for all. If you have an exponent and you’re raising it to
another exponent . . . if you have X3 all raised to the 4th, that’s when
you multiply the exponents. It’s the same as X3x4, or X12, final answer.

Sometimes, students make this mistake: If you have division with exponents.
If you have the same base for a numerator and denominator, but it’s X6 /
X3. Sometimes, students will say, “I’m just going to divide those
exponents.” What they say wrong is they’ll say it’s X6/3. X6/3 = X2. That
is completely wrong, do not do that. What you want to do when you divide
exponents, you subtract the exponents from one another. X6 / X3 is the same
thing as X6-3; X3, final answer.

One last error I want to show you, that students often make, is if you have
(2X)3. What students often do wrong is they will only apply the exponent to
the X. They’ll say “That is 2X3, final answer.” That is completely false.
Do not do that. What you’re going to do is apply the exponent to each
entity in the parentheses. The answer to (2X)3 is the same thing is 23 x X3
= 8X3, final answer.

Just go over those 4 rules I taught you, and you shouldn’t make any
careless mistakes when you see an exponent problem on the SAT. Good luck on
your test. I’ll talk to you soon.

Do the exponent rules confuse you? Which of the exponent rules trips you up the most?

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October 5th, 2012
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Using a Backsolving Technique to Score Higher on the SAT Math Section

Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished teaches you a helpful backsolving technique for scoring higher on the SAT Math Section.

Plug-in the answer choices usually starting with choice C because it’s the median of the five answer choices. If your first backsolving attempt doesn’t work, eliminate this answer choice and attempt the other answer choices until you find a match.
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Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi, everyone. Alexis Avila, founder of Prepped and Polished LLC., here in
Boston, Massachusetts. Now, one way to boost your SAT math score is to back-
solve using the answer choices. So, you can plug in the answer choices into
the problem and not have to worry about setting up complicated equations.

Now, here’s an example of how you can use the back-solving technique to
answer an SAT math question relatively quickly. So if three times quantity
Y minus one over two equals nine over Y minus two, then Y equals what? And
here are the answer choices. So, when you back-solve, you notice the
numbers are going in increasing order from A to E. So, you want to start
with answer choice C because it’s in the middle. Plus, it’s a relatively
easy number to back-solve.

We’re going to plug in one into the answer choices. So, instead of Y, we’re
going to put one to both sides and ask yourself, “Does three times one
minus one, three times zero; does zero equal nine over negative one?” No,
it does not, so you cross out C.

Okay, so answer choice C didn’t work. So, what do you do? Do you go to
answer choice B now and try that, or do you try answer choice D? I’m going
to go to answer choice D because it’s easier to plug in the number four
into the answer choices than it is to plug in negative one. So, if three
times four minus one over two, does that equal nine over four minus two?
So, does three times three over two equal nine over two? Absolutely. It
does. We have a perfect match. You go with answer choice D, and you move on
through the test.

Now, if you wanted to, you could solve this problem the long way, cross-
multiply and get a trinomial, but it will take you longer. Utilize the back-
solving technique with this particular problem, and you’ll solve this
question relatively quickly.

I wish you good luck on your SAT, and I’ll talk to you soon.

Did you find this SAT Math Backsolving tip helpful? Would you consider using this math approach on the SAT test?

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January 30th, 2012
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