Archive for the ‘SAT Grammar Writing’ Category

Episode 99, Don’t Confuse Comparative vs. Superlative Adjectives on the SAT and ACT

Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished teaches you how to avoid a common SAT, ACT Grammar mistake:

  1. Use the comparative form of the adjective/adverb when there are two objects
  2. Use the superlative form of the adjective/adverb when there are three or more objects.
  3. Never use the comparative/superlative forms for Absolute Adjectives

Episode 99, Don’t Confuse Comparative vs. Superlative Adjectives on the SAT and ACT

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October 20th, 2015
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Three Common SAT Grammar Mistakes Students Often Make and HOW TO AVOID THEM

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SAT Verbal Instructor Terri of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts lists three common grammar mistakes students often make and how to avoid them.

1. Avoid idiom errors by memorizing sets of words that must go together, usually involving a verb and preposition.
2. Avoid pronoun agreement errors by making sure pronouns agree in number and gender.
3. Avoid parallel structure errors by making sure that a series of equal items is written in the same logical structure.

 

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January 21st, 2014
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Featured, SAT Grammar Writing
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Five Tips to Master Sentence Improvements on the SAT Writing Section

SAT Tutor Terri K. of Prepped & Polished, LLC in South Natick, Massachusetts teaches you five tips and one bonus tip for sentence improvements on the SAT writing section

1. Read the entire sentence carefully.
2. Don’t waste time reading choice A carefully.

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3. Do not read the choices on their own.
4. Aggressively identify common problem areas in the sentences.
5. Eliminate any answer choice that changes the meaning of the original sentence.

BONUS TIP: If you get into a jam, select the most concise answer.

Are you getting ready for the SAT? Which of Terri’s sentence improvement tips for SAT writing section did you find most helpful?

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Get instant FREE access to our SAT E-Book: 13 SAT Tips You Can NOT Live Without

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December 4th, 2013
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How to Avoid Careless Mistakes on SAT Sentence Error Questions

Tips for SAT Sentence Error Questions

Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished offers advice on how to avoid careless mistakes on the SAT Sentence Error Questions on the SAT Writing Grammar Section.

Before circling an answer because it sounds wrong, come up with a valid replacement for the incorrect grammar.

Transcript (PDF)

Full Word-for-Word Transcription

Hi everyone, Alexis Avila found of Prepped and Polished LLC here in Boston.
Now 18 out of the 49 grammar questions on the SAT are sentence error
questions. What a lot of students do, of all levels, is they tend to read
the question, and then if something sounds funny in the sentence, they’ll
circle the answer and then they’ll just move on.

If you want to avoid careless mistakes on the sentence error portion of the
test, you have to work really methodically. So this is what I recommend
that you do with sentence error questions. You want to first read the
sentence and narrow in on the bad grammar.

So “Martha is the woman who sat on the couch.” that sounds pretty good,
“between you and I at the meeting, and who kept asking questions about
American Idol.” Well, we know that after a preposition between, you can’t
have the subject case pronoun after a preposition. So this is what I want
you to do. Instead of just choosing B because it sounds funny, I want you
to really know why we are going to choose B. So I want you to have a valid
replacement for the answer.

So after the preposition between, the pronoun shouldn’t be you and I, it
should be you and me. You need the object case form of the pronoun after a
preposition. So before you actually go ahead and choose B, I want you to
slash the incorrect answer, slash the mistake, and replace it with the
correct grammar. Then choose B and move on confidently through the sentence
error portion of the test. So do those things, and I guarantee you’re avoid
careless mistakes on the sentence errors.

I’ll talk to you soon.

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May 18th, 2011
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SAT Grammar Writing
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Avoid This Common SAT Grammar Mistake

Alexis Avila Founder/President of Prepped & Polished teaches you how to avoid a common SAT Grammar mistake:
1. Use the comparative form of the adjective/adverb when there are two objects
2. Use the superlative form of the adjective/adverb when there are three or more objects.
3. Never use the comparative/superlative forms for Absolute Adjectives.

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What did you think about this tip? Are there other grammar mistakes students often make?

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May 4th, 2010
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ESL, SAT Grammar Writing
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